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Daily News Summary
23 February 2022

image Coronavirus: School absences in England fall by 43 per cent
image Pupils who fail GCSE maths and English could be barred from student loans under new proposals
image Oxford and Cambridge increase their state school intake
image ISC ‘Spotlight On’ blog: A closer look at Lumina Tutoring
image Call for Gypsy, Roma and Traveller history to be embedded in the school curriculum
image 'Make the history and experiences of ethnic minorities mandatory in the curriculum'
image Decline in pupils studying D&T is harming social mobility in engineering, study suggests

Coronavirus: School absences in England fall by 43 per cent

 

Official figures have revealed that the number of children absent from state schools in England because of COVID has almost halved in a week, falling from 320,000 on 3 February to 182,000 on 10 February. By Will Hazell, iNews.

School leaders have warned that the Government's new living with COVID plan "does run the risk of causing a new wave of transmission and disruption in our schools and colleges". By Matilda Martin, Tes

The Department for Education has confirmed that secondary school staff and pupils will be able to access free COVID tests in response to local outbreaks. By Matilda Martin, Tes.

According to The Guardian, when compared to adults, primary school-aged children produce about four times fewer aerosol particles when breathing, speaking or singing, which could help explain why they seem to be at lower risk of spreading COVID. By Linda Geddes.

 

Pupils who fail GCSE maths and English could be barred from student loans under new proposals

 

The Times reports that pupils who fail GCSE English and maths could be prevented from taking out student loans under new government proposals to be announced this week. The Department for Education said new minimum entry requirements would help ensure pupils “aren’t being pushed into higher education before they are ready. Nicola Woolcock and Kieran Gair.

 
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The Times

Oxford and Cambridge increase their state school intake

 

According to data from the Higher Education Statistics Agency, Oxford and Cambridge have increased their state school intake to around 70 per cent, while many other leading British universities have admitted fewer state-educated pupils. By Nicola Woolcock and Matilda Davies, The Times.

 
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The Times

ISC ‘Spotlight On’ blog: A closer look at Lumina Tutoring

 

In the latest instalment of the ISC’s ‘Spotlight On’ blog series, Tim Dalton, director of Shaftesbury Enterprise at Harrow School, explains how a tutoring initiative is providing valuable catch-up support for looked after children as they recover from the pandemic.

If you would like to write a 'Spotlight On' blog about a state school partnership or outreach initiative taking place at your school, please email emily.roberts@isc.co.uk for further details.

 
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ISC

Call for Gypsy, Roma and Traveller history to be embedded in the school curriculum

 

Addressing MPs on the Commons Education Select Committee, school leaders and members of the Roma community have said that Gypsy, Roma and Traveller history should be included in the curriculum to help tackle racist bullying and prejudice in schools. By Will Hazell, iNews.

 
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iNews

'Make the history and experiences of ethnic minorities mandatory in the curriculum'

 

Footballer Troy Deeney has called for the history and experiences of Black, Asian and ethnic minorities to be made mandatory in the national curriculum after findings from a YouGov survey revealed that the majority of British teachers think the school system has a racial bias. By Nadine White, The Independent.

 
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The Independent

Decline in pupils studying D&T is harming social mobility in engineering, study suggests

 

A new study from the Sutton Trust and the Bridge Group has found that the decline in the number of students studying design and technology (D&T) could be preventing children from poorer backgrounds from becoming engineers. Tes.

 
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Tes

 

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