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Daily News Summary
30 July 2021

image Exams 2021: One in 10 A-level students was given a 'three-grade boost' last year following switch to TAGs
image Coronavirus: MPs call for campaign to get children exercising an hour a day post-lockdown
image 'Scrapping BTECs would be an act of educational vandalism'
image 'How Duncan Scott rose to Olympic greatness'
image 10 questions with Sally-Anne Huang
image PM hails investment in global education despite row over aid cuts
image Stormzy to fund 30 more scholarships for black students at Cambridge University

Exams 2021: One in 10 A-level students was given a 'three-grade boost' last year following switch to TAGs

 

According to a report by Ofqual, 10 per cent of A-level students' results improved by three or more grades after a controversial algorithm was replaced by teacher assessed grades (TAGs) last summer. The watchdog also found that pupils from independent schools and grammar schools were "more likely to be over-predicted at A-level". By Camilla Turner, The Telegraph. Key findings from Ofqual's analysis of last year's grades have been summarised by Schools Week. By Samantha Booth.

The National Association of Head Teachers has urged the Government to provide schools with advance information about GCSE and A-level exams from the start of the next academic year. By Catherine Lough, Tes.

Katie Ashford, deputy head at Michaela Community School, writes in The Telegraph arguing "a return to real exams is essential for restoring fairness to our education system".

The AQA exam board has indicated that it may be able to return more money to schools later in the year, after it was criticised for refunding just 26 per cent of its exam fees. By Samantha Booth, Schools Week.

An independent school teacher has written to first minister Nicola Sturgeon expressing their "great concern" about the impact of the cancellation of exams on pupils, adding that demand for counselling services in schools is "far outstripping supply". By Katrine Bussey, The Times.

 

Coronavirus: MPs call for campaign to get children exercising an hour a day post-lockdown

 

The House of Commons' Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee has urged the Government to set up a campaign similar to the "five a day" healthy eating message to encourage children to participate in organised sport, amid concerns about the impact of COVID lockdowns on children's activity levels. By Greg Heffer, Sky News.

University vice-chancellors have warned that delaying the decision on whether students need to be vaccinated to attend lectures is "legally and practically impossible". By Camilla Turner, The Telegraph.

Foreign secretary Dominic Raab has said university students will be given "advance warning" if they are required to have COVID vaccines before moving to halls of residence. By Francesca Gillett, BBC News.

 

'Scrapping BTECs would be an act of educational vandalism'

 

Lord Baker of Dorking, a former education secretary, has warned against proposals to scrap BTECs, saying the qualifications are "a particular help to disadvantaged young people". By Julia Belgutay, Tes.

 
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Tes

'How Duncan Scott rose to Olympic greatness'

 

The Telegraph features a spotlight piece on Duncan Scott, a former Strathallan School pupil who is on the verge of making British swimming history by winning four medals in a single Olympic games. By Jeremy Wilson.

 
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The Telegraph

10 questions with Sally-Anne Huang

 

Tes features an interview with Sally-Anne Huang, high master of St Paul's School and chair of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference, as part of its '10 questions with...' series. By Catherine Lough.

 
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Tes

PM hails investment in global education despite row over aid cuts

 

Prime minister Boris Johnson has said he is "immensely proud" of the achievements of the Global Partnership for Education Summit in raising $4 billion for international education, despite claims from charities that the UK's aid cuts have harmed fundraising efforts. By Sean Coughlan, BBC News.

 
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BBC

Stormzy to fund 30 more scholarships for black students at Cambridge University

 

The British rapper Stormzy is working in partnership with HSBC to fund 30 more scholarships for black students to study at Cambridge University. By Will Hazell, iNews.

 
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iNews

 

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