image  

Daily News Summary
13 May 2022

image Coronavirus: Inquiry chair seeks to explore the pandemic’s impact on children and education
image Exam papers must be stripped of middle-class bias, says Ofqual
image Letters: 'Now is the time to explore hybrid qualifications that prepare young people for the modern workforce'
image Remove school names from university applications to avoid prejudice against privately educated white boys, says professor
image Number of students graduating with a first-class degree has more than doubled in a decade
image A closer look at why some independent schools are opting for football over rugby
image Requests for EHCPs reach highest figure on record
image Up to 7,000 early-career teachers to receive £3,000 retention bonuses

Coronavirus: Inquiry chair seeks to explore the pandemic’s impact on children and education

 

Baroness Heather Hallet, the COVID inquiry chair, has written to the prime minister saying she wants to expand her remit to investigate how children and young people have been affected by the pandemic, including the impact on education and early years provision. By Samantha Booth, Schools Week.

Margaret Mulholland, SEND and inclusion policy specialist for the Association of School and College Leaders, has warned that extra funding for mental health support lead training in schools would not be enough to support the "thousands of pupils struggling right now with potentially catastrophic mental health issues as a direct result of the isolation and loss of normal routines suffered during the pandemic". By Matilda Martin, Tes.

 

Exam papers must be stripped of middle-class bias, says Ofqual

 

Ofqual has published new guidance for exam boards stating that GCSEs and A-level papers must refrain from using “complex” language and show clearer layouts, amid concerns some pupils are disadvantaged by ‘middle-class bias’. By India McTaggart, The Telegraph.

 
image
The Telegraph

Letters: 'Now is the time to explore hybrid qualifications that prepare young people for the modern workforce'

 

In a letter to The Times, Jane Lunnon, head at Alleyn's School, suggests that existing assessments are "outdated" and now is the time to "explore afresh the possibilities for hybrid qualifications that promote interdisciplinary learning, encourage exploratory and adventurous thinking". The letter is the second featured on the page.

 
image
The Times

Remove school names from university applications to avoid prejudice against privately educated white boys, says professor

 

Cambridge academic Professor David Abulafia has suggested that universities should remove school names from application forms to avoid any perceived prejudice against privately educated white boys. Mr Abulafia said: "Penalising applicants for their parents’ choice of school strips the pupil of any agency." By Nicola Woolcock, The Times.

Speaking at the Admissions, Marketing and Communications in Independent Schools (AMCIS) conference this week, Lord Black of Brentwood said that Oxbridge would miss out on “great talent” if they reduced admissions from independent schools. By Irena Barker, Independent School Management Plus.

 

Number of students graduating with a first-class degree has more than doubled in a decade

 

According to an analysis by the Office for Students (OfS), the proportion of students graduating with a first-class degree has more than doubled in a decade, with 38 per cent of students awarded a first in 2020-21. By Hazel Shearing, BBC News.

 
image
BBC

A closer look at why some independent schools are opting for football over rugby

 

The Telegraph explores some of the reasons why football is becoming the sport of choice at many independent schools. By Sam Dean.

 
image
The Telegraph

Requests for EHCPs reach highest figure on record

 

Newly published data from the Department for Education has revealed that requests for education health and care plans (EHCPs) soared again last year to 93,302, the highest figure since records began in 2016. By Samantha Booth, Schools Week.

 
image
Schools Week

Up to 7,000 early-career teachers to receive £3,000 retention bonuses

 

Schools Week reports up to 7,000 early-career computing, maths, physics and chemistry teachers are to receive £3,000 retention bonuses, amid concerns of a growing exodus of staff. By Tom Belger.

 
image
Schools Week

 

The Independent Schools Council (ISC) monitors the national and educational press in order to keep independent schools up-to-date with relevant education news. The DNS is a service primarily for schools in membership of ISC associations, although other interested parties can choose to sign-up. We endeavour to include relevant news and commentary and, wherever possible, notable public letters. Where capacity allows, we may include links to ISC blogs, press statements and information about school or association events. News stories are selected based on their relevance to the independent sector as a whole. Editorial control of the DNS remains solely with the ISC.

Sign-up to the email service is available on our website.

Members can contact the ISC if they know in advance of news, letters or opinions that are likely to feature in the media, or are aware of existing coverage which they would like to see featured in the DNS.

Headlines and first-line summaries are written by the ISC with the link directing to the source material. You should read and comply with the terms and conditions of the websites to which we link.