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Daily News Summary
29 March 2022

image White paper: Nadhim Zahawi sets out his vision for schools
image Key proposals from the Government's SEND green paper
image ‘We need to act now and help children catch up on lost learning’
image ISC blog: 'We encourage pupils to see that they are still in the game, that they haven’t blown it'
image Universities told to stop using students' backgrounds as an excuse for drop-out rates and poor job outcomes
image Social media use linked to less life satisfaction for some children, study finds

White paper: Nadhim Zahawi sets out his vision for schools

 

Schools Week outlines all the policies featured in the Government's schools white paper. In a separate article, Schools Week lists the 24 “priority education investment areas” identified in the white paper that will receive around £40 million extra funding to address “entrenched underperformance, including in literacy and numeracy”. By Freddie Whittaker.

Speaking to journalists on Monday, Nadhim Zahawi, the education secretary, said that he wants to bring “operational competence and rigour” to the Department for Education as he unveiled a new blueprint for schools in England. By Will Hazell, iNews.

The Guardian reports that the white paper has left many many in the sector feeling underwhelmed by “inoffensive" policies. By Sally Weale.

A leading article in The Times suggests that there are three significant problems within the British education system that are not adequately addressed by the Government’s schools white paper, including the 'alarming scale of underachievement'.

 

Key proposals from the Government's SEND green paper

 

Tes takes a closer look at the Government's long-awaited green paper that outlines plans to improve provision for children with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND). By John Roberts.

According to The Guardian, mainstream schools in England will be required to “change their culture and practice” to become more inclusive of children with special educational needs and disabilities. By Sally Weale.

 

‘We need to act now and help children catch up on lost learning’

 

Columnist Gaby Hinsliff writes for The Guardian warning that if we do not act now to combat learning loss caused by the pandemic "then we will be living with the social, academic and economic consequences of having let these young people down for years to come".

 
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The Guardian

ISC blog: 'We encourage pupils to see that they are still in the game, that they haven’t blown it'

 

In the latest ISC blog, Spencer Leach, director of sport at Bedales, argues that careful management of a tension between competing and ensuring everybody is involved is key to ensuring all pupils can learn about themselves and develop confidence through sport.

 
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ISC

Universities told to stop using students' backgrounds as an excuse for drop-out rates and poor job outcomes

 

John Blake, the new director for fair access and participation at the Office for Students, has said that universities should stop using deprived backgrounds as an excuse for their students dropping out or failing to get decent jobs. By Will Hazell, iNews.

 
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iNews

Social media use linked to less life satisfaction for some children, study finds

 

A new study by Nature Communications has found that the more time girls aged between 11 and 13 spend on social media, the less likely they are to be satisfied with life a year later. The findings also show the same pattern for boys aged 14 to 15, and 19-year-old boys and girls. BBC News.

 
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BBC

 

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