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Daily News Summary
5 July 2022

image Coronavirus: Schoolchildren face being sent home if COVID-related staff absences rise
image “Young people are leaving school without the entrepreneurial skills necessary to succeed”
image 'Schools should not teach children about transgender issues without parents' knowledge'
image Letters: 'Teenage girls need to learn how to navigate the challenges of female friendships'
image Universities warn fewer graduates will get a first-class degree next year
image Ask children to write poems instead of analysing them, says children's laureate
image School caterers switch to meat from abroad amid rising food costs
image Students taking GCSEs in ancient languages report highest levels of stress

Coronavirus: Schoolchildren face being sent home if COVID-related staff absences rise

 

Schools across the country are warning parents that children could be sent home before the summer holidays because of COVID-related staff absences. By Louisa Clarence-Smith, The Telegraph

Nadhim Zahawi, the education secretary, told MPs at the House of Commons that he does not think “any teacher would want to strike” after the damage the pandemic has done to pupils. By Freddie Whittaker, Schools Week.

 

“Young people are leaving school without the entrepreneurial skills necessary to succeed”

 

A joint letter from 250 business leaders shown to The Times has raised concerns that schools are failing students by not adequately equipping them with the entrepreneurial skills they need for work. By James Hurley, The Times.

 
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The Times

'Schools should not teach children about transgender issues without parents' knowledge'

 

The education secretary, Nadhim Zahawi, has warned that transgender issues should not be taught to children without their parents’ knowledge, adding: "There are clear requirements on schools in relation to providing parents with information about a school’s curriculum." By Dominic Penna, The Telegraph.

 
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The Telegraph

Letters: 'Teenage girls need to learn how to navigate the challenges of female friendships'

 

In a letter to The Times, Zinnia Wilkinson, director of pastoral care at Malvern St James Girls’ School, responds to an article discussing the rise of ‘subtle bullying’ among teenage girls. Ms Wilkinson argues “it is wiser for parents to be sounding boards than fixers for daughters who are anxious about friendships”, adding: "Girls need to learn to navigate their own way through the choppy waters of female friendship." The letter can be found towards the end of the page.

 
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The Times

Universities warn fewer graduates will get a first-class degree next year

 

According to The Telegraph, graduates will be less likely to get a first-class degree next year, as Universities UK and GuildHE are set to announce plans to reverse pandemic grade inflation. By Louisa Clarence-Smith.

 
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The Telegraph

Ask children to write poems instead of analysing them, says children's laureate

 

Joseph Coelho, the new children's laureate, has suggested pupils should be taught to write poetry rather than just read it, adding: “I’m all up for analysing poetry but not everyone is, and if that’s your only introduction to poetry I think it’s an awful shame." By Anita Singh, The Telegraph.

 
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The Telegraph

School caterers switch to meat from abroad amid rising food costs

 

Laca, the school food caterers’ association, has warned that some school caterers have started using more processed food while others have switched from British meat to meat from abroad as a result of rising food costs. By Louisa Clarence-Smith, The Telegraph.

 
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The Telegraph

Students taking GCSEs in ancient languages report highest levels of stress

 

According to an analysis by Access Education of posts made in May on The Student Room, the UK’s largest online student community, students taking GCSEs in ancient languages reported the highest levels of stress in the recent round of exams. By Julian Owen, Independent Education Today.

 
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IE Today

 

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