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Daily News Summary
28 April 2022

image Heads are reducing lesson times and cutting staff to save on energy bills, findings suggest
image Girls don't like physics because they would rather not do hard maths, claims social mobility tsar
image COVID pandemic 'drove 60,000 more secondary schoolchildren into clinical depression'
image More than nine in 10 teachers feel their job has 'adversely affected' their wellbeing
image A closer look at the 'failing' special needs system
image Many underperforming schools will 'miss out' on levelling-up support, analysis suggests
image 'Maintained schools and single academy trusts can share their vision through MATs'
image Number of children in custody in England and Wales expected to double by 2024

Heads are reducing lesson times and cutting staff to save on energy bills, findings suggest

 

According to a survey by the National Association of Head Teachers, some heads say they have had to reduce lesson time and cut spending on teaching and teaching assistants amid rising energy bills. The poll also found that, on average, headteachers are expecting a 106 per cent increase in energy costs over the next year in their schools. By India McTaggart, The Telegraph.

 
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The Telegraph

Girls don't like physics because they would rather not do hard maths, claims social mobility tsar

 

Katharine Birbalsingh, a headteacher and chair of the Social Mobility Commission, has been criticised for suggesting that girls do not study physics at school because "it isn't something they fancy" and they would rather not do the "hard maths". By Joe Pinkstone, The Telegraph.

Addressing the Commons Science and Technology Committee yesterday, Ms Birbalsingh appeared to cast doubt on targets to boost literacy and numeracy, saying she is "not sure" how they will be achieved. By Freddie Whittaker, Schools Week.

 

COVID pandemic 'drove 60,000 more secondary schoolchildren into clinical depression'

 

A new study from University College London has found that depressive symptoms such as low mood, loss of pleasure and poor concentration in adolescents increased by six per cent after COVID struck, leading to approximately 60,000 more secondary school students surpassing a clinical threshold for depression. By Sarah Knapton, The Telegraph.

 
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The Telegraph

More than nine in 10 teachers feel their job has 'adversely affected' their wellbeing

 

According to a survey by the NASUWT teaching union, 91 per cent of teachers and headteachers feel their job has adversely impacted their mental health in the last 12 months. By Matilda Martin, Tes.

 
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Tes

A closer look at the 'failing' special needs system

 

A joint investigation by Schools Week and the Bureau of Investigative Journalism explores the 'broken' special needs system, highlighting the scale of the challenge ahead for SEND reforms. By Gareth Davies and Samantha Booth.

 
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Schools Week

Many underperforming schools will 'miss out' on levelling-up support, analysis suggests

 

Analysis published by data company SchoolDash suggests many struggling schools will miss out on levelling-up support because of the "blunt" way it is being targeted. By Callum Mason and Matilda Martin, Tes.

 
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Tes

'Maintained schools and single academy trusts can share their vision through MATs'

 

Speaking at the Schools and Academies Show yesterday, Baroness Barran, the academies minister, said the Government is enabling councils to run multi-academy trusts (MATs) because it knows there are "high quality" maintained schools and it wants them to share their leadership. By John Roberts, Tes.

 
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Tes

Number of children in custody in England and Wales expected to double by 2024

 

A report by the National Audit Office has said that the number of children in custody in England and Wales is set to double by 2024, and has highlighted the disproportionate number of black and minority ethnic children in the youth justice system. By Sally Weale, The Guardian.

 
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The Guardian

 

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