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Daily News Summary
2 November 2021

image Coronavirus: Nadhim Zahawi calls for an extended school day
image House of Commons: Oral question about independent and state school partnerships
image COP26: "The biggest disruption will come from the youngest voices"
image New Welsh schools and colleges to be net zero from January 2022
image Seven schools to become carbon-zero in five years
image MPs sign off on Katharine Birbalsingh as chair of the Social Mobility Commission
image Exam boards could be asked to avoid "complex language" in assessments
image Multi-academy trust drive is "not a race", national schools commissioner says

Coronavirus: Nadhim Zahawi calls for an extended school day

 

Nadhim Zahawi, the education secretary, has said that the school day should be extended to at least six-and-a-half hours to help combat learning loss caused by the pandemic. He added that there are some "excellent examples" of schools already running on an extended timetable to provide children with more time in the classroom. By Camilla Turner, The Telegraph.

School leaders have warned that disruption to education could continue following the return to school after half-term. James Bowen, the director of policy at the National Association of Head Teachers, said "given the high case numbers that we are still seeing in communities, school leaders are worried that unless the Government does more, disruption is likely to continue for the foreseeable future". By Will Hazell, iNews.

Tes takes a closer look at the scale of regional learning loss caused by the coronavirus pandemic. By Matilda Martin and Catherine Lough.

 

House of Commons: Oral question about independent and state school partnerships

 

In a debate in the House of Commons yesterday, Brendan Clarke-Smith, Conservative MP for Bassetlaw, asked the minister for school standards how he intends to encourage partnerships between independent and state schools, highlighting the ISC’s upcoming “Celebrating Partnerships” report. In response, Robin Walker said the Government is “committed to cross-sector partnerships across England”, and made reference to a partnership between Worksop College in Bassetlaw and 11 local state schools. Mr Walker added: “Such partnerships can form a key part of economic recovery, and I welcome the forthcoming 'Celebrating Partnerships' report.” Hansard.

 
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Hansard

COP26: "The biggest disruption will come from the youngest voices"

 

Robin Macpherson, the head of college at Robert Gordon's College, has written for Tes outlining three things teachers can expect to learn about during COP26.

Steve Brace, the head of education and outdoor learning at the Royal Geographical Society, discusses the importance of sustainability in schools. Tes.

 

New Welsh schools and colleges to be net zero from January 2022

 

The Welsh Government has said that new school and college buildings will have to meet net zero targets from January next year. Jeremy Miles, the education minister, said it was "an important contribution to our ambitious plan" of a net zero Wales by 2050. By Bethan Lewis, BBC News.

 
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BBC

Seven schools to become carbon-zero in five years

 

Forfar Education, an education group that owns seven schools and nurseries, has pledged to make its entire school group carbon-zero in five years. John Forsyth, chief executive of Forfar Education, said "we must also now weave environmental responsibility and ecological sustainability into all we do, so that our children are inspired to play their part”. By James Higgins, Independent Education Today.

 
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IE Today

MPs sign off on Katharine Birbalsingh as chair of the Social Mobility Commission

 

MPs have signed off on the appointment of Katharine Birbalsingh as chair of the Social Mobility Commission. The Parliamentary Women and Equalities Committee called Ms Birbalsingh a “bold and interesting” choice and recommended an initial three-year term. By Freddie Whittaker, Schools Week.

 
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Schools Week

Exam boards could be asked to avoid "complex language" in assessments

 

Ofqual has published draft guidance aimed at addressing the ways in which some pupils are “unfairly disadvantaged" by complex language in exams. The new guidance means exam boards could be asked to avoid using colloquialisms, sarcasm and idioms in assessments to make them more accessible for pupils. By Rachel Hall, The Guardian.

 
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The Guardian

Multi-academy trust drive is "not a race", national schools commissioner says

 

Dominic Herrington, the national schools commissioner, told a Westminster Education Forum conference yesterday that the Government’s multi-academy trust drive is “not a race," adding "there’s no hard target or legislation". By Tom Belger, Schools Week.

 
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Schools Week

 

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