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Daily News Summary
25 May 2021

image Coronavirus: Quarter of UK children 'lacked suitable workspace during lockdown'
image School sexual abuse helpline refers 65 cases to authorities
image The Times Education Commission: Exam reform, teacher retention and pupil mental health
image Teacher training review could lead to a 'significant reduction' in providers
image 'Having happy children is more important than topping school league tables'
image 'We need to end the negative narrative that plagues summer-born children'

Coronavirus: Quarter of UK children 'lacked suitable workspace during lockdown'

 

Survey findings from Exeter University and the London School of Economics suggest a quarter of children in the UK did not have a quiet place to study at home during lockdown. By Will Hazell, iNews.

Celia Walden writes in The Telegraph questioning calls to introduce a "creative syllabus" as part of education recovery plans.

Study findings from the Social Finance think tank suggest disadvantaged children are the most persistently absent from school during the pandemic. By Jason Farrell, Sky News.

Professor Russell Viner, president of the Royal College of Paediatrics and member of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies, has said schools are not amplifying the spread of the Indian coronavirus variant, adding there is no evidence that the strain poses a greater threat to youngsters. By Luke Andrews, The Mail.

Bernadette Easton, the new president of NASUWT Scotland, has warned that the Scottish education system is "on the verge of a crisis" amid COVID pressures. Tes.

 

School sexual abuse helpline refers 65 cases to authorities

 

The Report Abuse in Education helpline, which was set up after pupils shared testimonies of sexual abuse and harassment to the Everyone's Invited website, has already received 350 calls in less than two months, and has led to 65 cases being referred to police or child services. By Emma Yeomans, The Times.

A survey of more than 1,500 UK teachers has found that more than half do not feel adequate procedures are in place in their schools to deal with peer-on-peer sexual abuse. By Hayley Hassall and Jim Booth, BBC News.

Education secretary Gavin Williamson has written to the children's commissioner asking how schools can be helped to tackle the issues highlighted by the Everyone's Invited campaign. By Catherine Lough, Tes.

 

The Times Education Commission: Exam reform, teacher retention and pupil mental health

 

Geoff Barton, general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders and a Times education commissioner, has called for reform to the exams system to protect the "dignity" of young people and improve teacher retention. By Nicola Woolcock, The Times.

According to research for the Times Education Commission, 70 per cent of teachers believe there is too much emphasis on homework and marking, and a third of teachers plan to leave the profession within five years. By Nicola Woolcock, Rachel Sylvester and Ryan Watts, The Times.

The Times explores the impact of the pandemic on the mental health of children and young people. By Rachel Sylvester.

 

Teacher training review could lead to a 'significant reduction' in providers

 

Tes reports the Department for Education's review of initial teacher training could lead to a significant reduction in the number of providers allowed to operate. By Amy Gibbons.

 
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Tes

'Having happy children is more important than topping school league tables'

 

Sara Tor writes in The Times in response to reports that Britain is an "average performer" in international school league tables. She argues that maths, science and reading, the only subjects measured in the rankings, "are not the be all and end all", adding "it is better to be average and have happy children".

 
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The Times

'We need to end the negative narrative that plagues summer-born children'

 

Emma Reed writes in The Telegraph arguing the narrative that children born in the summer are behind their peers developmentally "could do more long-term harm than any natural disadvantages".

 
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The Telegraph

 

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