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Daily News Summary
19 May 2021

image Coronavirus: 'Education catch-up could take three years'
image Exams 2021: 'A post-COVID world cannot tolerate inefficiencies nor injustices'
image 'Struggling pupils should be given more time to complete their GCSEs'
image Letters: 'Technology alone is not the answer to education reform'
image Concerns raised over pupil sexual misconduct in schools
image Record numbers of ethnic minority and state pupils accepted into Cambridge University
image PM announces funding packages as part of 'levelling up' agenda
image Nicola Sturgeon sets out education priorities post-election

Coronavirus: 'Education catch-up could take three years'

 

Amanda Spielman, Ofsted's chief inspector, has warned that it could take up to three years for children to catch up on their learning. By Will Hazell, iNews.

Sir Kevan Collins, the education recovery commissioner, has said that plans to extend the school day should be compulsory to "guarantee" the attendance of disadvantaged pupils. By Amy Gibbons and Catherine Lough, Tes.

The education recovery commissioner has suggested that schools could continue to host parents' evenings online after the pandemic. By Nicola Woolcock, The Times.

According to Schools Week, the Department for Education is considering buying up to 360,000 abacuses for schools to support maths catch-up learning. By Samantha Booth.

 

Exams 2021: 'A post-COVID world cannot tolerate inefficiencies nor injustices'

 

Neil McLennan, leadership programme director at Aberdeen University, and Dr Robert White, an education fellow at Durham University, write in The Times calling for reform to Scotland's education system, adding that the Scottish Qualifications Authority "must learn lessons from last year's ineptitude".

An anonymous secondary school headteacher in Scotland writes in Tes arguing this year's assessment system is putting "huge pressure" on teachers and students.

 

'Struggling pupils should be given more time to complete their GCSEs'

 

The education recovery commissioner has suggested that pupils who struggle academically should be allowed to spend four years doing their GCSEs, rather than two. By Nicola Woolcock, The Times.

 
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The Times

Letters: 'Technology alone is not the answer to education reform'

 

Andrew Copeman, an English teacher at Latymer Upper School, writes to The Times in response to William Hague's call for a 'school revolution'. He argues that "nothing can replace face-to-face teaching", adding: "Smaller class sizes would make an immediate impact on school standards." The letter is the third featured on the page.

 
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The Times

Concerns raised over pupil sexual misconduct in schools

 

Findings from a Tes survey suggest 33 per cent of primary school staff have come across at least one instance of sexual misconduct involving pupils at their school in the last year. By Claudia Civinini and Catherine Lough, Tes. The survey has also revealed 'concerning' levels of sexual harassment and misconduct among students in secondary schools. By Claudia Civinini and Catherine Lough, Tes.

According to separate findings from Tes, 49 per cent of teachers do not feel there is sufficient guidance for schools on how to deal with allegations of sexual harassment and abuse. By Claudia Civinini and Catherine Lough.

 

Record numbers of ethnic minority and state pupils accepted into Cambridge University

 

According to Cambridge University's annual admissions statistics, 29.3 per cent of British students admitted in 2020 were from black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds, and 70.6 per cent of students were educated at state schools. By Nicola Woolcock, The Times.

 
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The Times

PM announces funding packages as part of 'levelling up' agenda

 

Prime minister Boris Johnson has announced an £18 million extension of the opportunity areas programme, as well as £10 million for local authorities to help improve the quality of teaching. By Freddie Whittaker, Schools Week.

 
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Schools Week

Nicola Sturgeon sets out education priorities post-election

 

Nicola Sturgeon has outlined her education pledges for the first 100 days of the new Parliament following her election as first minister. By Henry Hepburn, Tes.

The Times reports John Swinney has lost his role as Scotland's education secretary, but will remain in post as deputy first minister with a focus on COVID recovery. By Mark McLaughlin.

 

 

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