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Daily News Summary
17 May 2021

image Exams 2022: Ofqual launches consultation on next year's assessments
image Coronavirus: Boris Johnson and Rishi Sunak 'at loggerheads' over £15bn education catch-up package
image New ombudsman may be needed to investigate specific cases of abuse, says Ofsted chief
image Schools working to diversify the medical profession
image Black LGBT+ pupils least likely to feel safe at school, findings suggest
image Councils plan SEND cuts amid funding shortfalls
image Government to launch consultation on cutting tuition fees
image Church of England issues new guidance on school assemblies

Exams 2022: Ofqual launches consultation on next year's assessments

 

Ofqual has put forward its proposals for changes to next year's non-exam assessments, as part of a two-week consultation process. By Zoe Tidman, The Independent.

The heads of some Russell Group universities are reportedly concerned that they may be forced to admit thousands of extra students this year due to grade inflation. By Anna Fazackerley, The Guardian.

Connect, Scotland's largest independent parents group, has written an open letter to the first minister and the Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA) questioning the fairness of this year's assessments. BBC News.

According to The Times, hundreds of pupils across Scotland are sharing information about exam assessments online, despite warnings from the SQA. By Cath Ashcroft.

BBC News reports positive COVID cases in Welsh schools are forcing pupils in exam years to self-isolate at home.

 

Coronavirus: Boris Johnson and Rishi Sunak 'at loggerheads' over £15bn education catch-up package

 

According to The Times, Boris Johnson and Rishi Sunak are in disagreement over the funding of a proposed 15 billion COVID-19 education recovery package. By Rachel Sylvester and Nicola Woolcock. A separate article in The Times calls on the prime minister to "override" the chancellor, saying: "The £15 billion could be used to fund a wide range of effective programmes."

BBC News reports secondary school students in parts of north-west England will continue wearing face masks due to concerns about the Indian variant of the virus.

 

New ombudsman may be needed to investigate specific cases of abuse, says Ofsted chief

 

Amanda Spielman, Ofsted's chief inspector, has said there may be an "unsatisfied need in the system" for an ombudsman to investigate schools' handling of cases of alleged sexual abuse and harassment. By Will Hazell, iNews.

 
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iNews

Schools working to diversify the medical profession

 

The Times explores how some state schools are offering practical medical training to pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds, as part of efforts to diversify the profession. By Nicola Woolcock. A separate commentary in The Times praises the work of these schools, adding the Government should consider "how they can support and incentivise different parts of the education system to help each other". The article mentions Francis Holland School in London and Mount Kelly in Devon.

 

Black LGBT+ pupils least likely to feel safe at school, findings suggest

 

A survey has found that 52 per cent of black LGBT+ pupils have felt safe in school on a daily basis over the last 12 months, and are twice as likely as their white peers to say they have "never" felt safe in school. By Nadine White, The Independent.

 
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The Independent

Councils plan SEND cuts amid funding shortfalls

 

According to The Observer, local authorities in England facing significant funding shortfalls are having to cut back care packages for children with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND). By Chaminda Jayanetti.

 
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The Observer

Government to launch consultation on cutting tuition fees

 

The Sunday Times reports university tuition fees could be cut from £9,250 to a maximum of £7,500, though some are concerned that arts and humanities subjects could disappear without top-up funding from the Government. By Sian Griffiths.

Hillary Gyebi-Ababio, the National Union of Students' vice president for higher education, has criticised education secretary Gavin Williamson for his remarks on "dead-end" university courses, claiming the comments constitute "an assault on a multitude of hugely valuable disciplines that enrich our society". By Zoe Tidman, The Independent.

 

Church of England issues new guidance on school assemblies

 

As part of a new statement of "entitlement and expectation" published by the Church of England, religious schools have been advised to "ensure that pupils and adults do not feel compelled to sing strongly confessional lyrics - there should be no assumption of Christian faith in those present". By Nicola Woolcock and Kaya Burgess, The Times.

 
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The Times

 

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