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Daily News Summary
26 March 2021

image Coronavirus: 'Not enough evidence' to stop wearing face masks in secondary schools
image Exams 2021: MPs warn this year's grading system could become a 'Wild West'
image 'Serious claims of sexual violence in schools must be reported to the police'
image 'Attracting families from all backgrounds is a win-win for any educational setting'
image 'Fundamental questions are being asked about the purpose of GCSEs'
image Government to announce major revamp of the music syllabus
image 'What does the future of single-sex schools look like?'

Coronavirus: 'Not enough evidence' to stop wearing face masks in secondary schools

 

Kevin Courtney, joint general secretary of the National Education Union (NEU), has said that face masks should remain in secondary schools "until the science says that it's safe to remove them". By Zoe Tidman, The Independent.

According to Public Health England's latest flu and COVID-19 report, 42 per cent of suspected coronavirus outbreaks recorded last week occurred in education settings. By James Carr, Schools Week.

John Edward, director of the Scottish Council of Independent Schools, has said the majority of independent schools in Scotland have been able to welcome secondary pupils back safely. By Caroline Wilson, The Herald.

A report from the National Association of Head Teachers has warned that the supply of school leaders is "at risk of collapse", with less than half saying they would recommend their job as a career goal. By Amy Gibbons, Tes.

Tes reports on survey findings which suggest 46 per cent of teachers have considered leaving the profession this year due to the pressures of the pandemic. By Catherine Lough.

Schools Week summarises key findings from the Public Accounts Committee about the Department for Education's (DfE) COVID-19 response. By Freddie Whittaker.

According to Schools Week, Oxbridge colleges are reducing the number of offers made this year to avoid a "bulge" in admissions caused by grade inflation. By Freddie Whittaker.

 

Exams 2021: MPs warn this year's grading system could become a 'Wild West'

 

Robert Halfon, chair of the Education Select Committee, has written to Gavin Williamson expressing concerns that plans for this summer's GCSEs and A-levels could lead to "much higher grade inflation". By Will Hazell, iNews.

Kevin Courtney, joint general secretary of the NEU, has claimed that some pupils are "being more polite, more diligent and getting on with the work that they're being set" because they know that teachers will be deciding their grades this year. By Will Hazell, iNews.

According to Tes, the DfE asked exam boards if they could move GCSE and A-level exams online this summer. By Catherine Lough. A separate article in Tes explores how education systems in other countries have switched to online exams. By Catherine Lough.

 

'Serious claims of sexual violence in schools must be reported to the police'

 

Responding to testimonials shared to the Everyone's Invited website, Rachel de Souza, the children's commissioner for England, has said serious allegations of sexual violence and harassment in schools must be reported to the police. By Sima Kotecha, BBC News. The subject was discussed further on BBC Newsnight yesterday. Watch from 17:54.

Schools Week reports the Everyone's Invited campaign has stopped publishing the names of schools, amid concerns that some are taking a "disproportionate amount of blame". By Samantha Booth.

Helen Pike, master of Magdalen College School, writes in The Telegraph arguing schools "have an important role to play" in educating boys about consent and respect.

Cordelia Morrison, relationships officer for Tender, a charity working with young people to prevent domestic and sexual violence, writes in The Guardian explaining how educational workshops can give children the opportunity to "discuss their views, explore boundaries and evaluate how their choices can help, or harm".

An article in The Telegraph reports on some of the independent schools named on the Everyone's Invited website. By Rosa Silverman, Eleanor Steafel and Luke Mintz.

 

'Attracting families from all backgrounds is a win-win for any educational setting'

 

Rosie McColl, headmistress at Brighton Girls School, writes in The Telegraph about the value of independent school bursaries and scholarships, and explains why she decided to introduce the country's first skateboarding scholarship.

 
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The Telegraph

'Fundamental questions are being asked about the purpose of GCSEs'

 

According to The Times, the NEU is urging the Government to re-evaluate curriculum and assessment, and will debate a motion calling for the abolition of GCSEs at its annual conference this Easter. By Nicola Woolcock.

 
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The Times

Government to announce major revamp of the music syllabus

 

The Telegraph reports all pupils in the country will be taught about Mozart, Tchaikovsky and Beethoven, as part of a new "model" music curriculum to be announced by the Government today. By Camilla Turner.

Writing in The Telegraph, Nick Gibb, the minister for school standards, welcomes the reforms, saying: "After the most difficult of years, it's time for a musical renaissance across England's schools."

Ivan Hewett, a classical music critic, writes in The Telegraph arguing the "inspiring vision" behind the new curriculum will remain out of reach "unless the Government tackles the huge inequalities in music education".

 

'What does the future of single-sex schools look like?'

 

David James, deputy head of Lady Eleanor Holles School, considers the role of single-sex schools "in a society that is increasingly progressive, meritocratic and diverse". Tes.

 
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Tes

 

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