image  

Daily News Summary
24 June 2021

image Coronavirus: Ministers urged to make a decision on vaccinating children in England
image Exams 2021: GCSEs and A-levels likely to face adjustments next year
image Critics respond to report highlighting underachievement of white working class pupils
image More than 200,000 children living in 'education deserts'
image Some universities to make fewer offers this year to avoid overcrowding
image University regulator launches review into 'inclusive' assessment policies
image Proportion of pupils who enjoy writing falls to record low

Coronavirus: Ministers urged to make a decision on vaccinating children in England

 

According to The Guardian, education unions are calling on ministers to make a swift decision on whether to vaccinate teenagers for COVID-19. By Jessica Elgot and Richard Adams.

Sir Kevan Collins, the former education recovery commissioner, has said the full impact of the pandemic on children's wellbeing is not yet known. By Zoe Tidman, The Independent.

An investigation by The Pharmaceutical Journal has revealed that the number of children taking antidepressants has risen to an all-time high during the pandemic, with a 40 per cent increase in drugs being prescribed to those under the age of 17. By Laura Donnelly, The Telegraph. A separate article in The Telegraph offers advice for parents whose children may be suffering from 'locked-in trauma'. By Tanith Carey.

Teachers have been accused of taking an "overcautious" approach to self-isolation, after it emerged that 172,000 pupils were self-isolating at home last week - up from 40,000 the previous week. By Camilla Turner, The Telegraph.

Shirley-Anne Somerville, Scotland's education secretary, has said she is "very keen" to increase the uptake of COVID tests among pupils and school staff. By Emma Seith, Tes.

 

Exams 2021: GCSEs and A-levels likely to face adjustments next year

 

Education secretary Gavin Williamson has told MPs that changes to next year's exams are being considered to "ensure that there's fairness and there's the right level of support" for pupils. By Sean Coughlan, BBC News.

The Telegraph provides a breakdown of changes to next year's exams, subject by subject. By Camilla Turner.

 

Critics respond to report highlighting underachievement of white working class pupils

 

David Gillborn, emeritus professor of critical race studies at the University of Birmingham, writes in The Guardian claiming the Education Select Committee's report is "the latest step in an ongoing campaign to use the underachievement of poor white people as a weapon to demonise antiracism and keep the same people angry at the wrong target".

Lee Shackleton writes in The Telegraph in response to the Education Select Committee's findings, arguing: "Helping disadvantaged children, whether white British or other ethnicity, must begin with an understanding of their parents and the particular problems they face."

Speaking to iNews, two mothers claim the Committee's report 'detracts from the real issue of how poverty is failing everyone'. By Aasma Day.

 

More than 200,000 children living in 'education deserts'

 

According to The Times, a report expected tomorrow will reveal that one in every 25 primary age children lives in a local area containing only underperforming primary schools. By Nicola Woolcock.

Will Tanner, director of Onward, writes in The Times arguing "opportunity bound by geography" is the problem lying behind the Government's levelling up agenda.

 

Some universities to make fewer offers this year to avoid overcrowding

 

The Guardian reports some universities are making between 10 per cent and 20 per cent fewer offers this year to avoid overcrowding, meaning some students are missing out on places for popular courses. By Rachel Hall and Richard Adams.

 
image
The Guardian

University regulator launches review into 'inclusive' assessment policies

 

The Office for Students will investigate universities with 'inclusive' assessment policies that overlook spelling and grammar mistakes, according to The Telegraph. By Ewan Somerville.

 
image
The Telegraph

Proportion of pupils who enjoy writing falls to record low

 

According to a report by the National Literacy Trust, only around a third of children and young people say they find pleasure from writing, compared to two in five last year. Tes.

 
image
Tes

 

The Independent Schools Council (ISC) monitors the national and educational press in order to keep independent schools up-to-date with relevant education news. The DNS is a service primarily for schools in membership of ISC associations, although other interested parties can choose to sign-up. We endeavour to include relevant news and commentary and, wherever possible, notable public letters. Where capacity allows, we may include links to ISC blogs, press statements and information about school or association events. News stories are selected based on their relevance to the independent sector as a whole. Editorial control of the DNS remains solely with the ISC.

Sign-up to the email service is available on our website.

Members can contact the ISC if they know in advance of news, letters or opinions that are likely to feature in the media, or are aware of existing coverage which they would like to see featured in the DNS.

Headlines and first-line summaries are written by the ISC with the link directing to the source material. You should read and comply with the terms and conditions of the websites to which we link.