image  

Daily News Summary
15 June 2021

image Exams 2021: Majority of headteachers want 75% rebate on this year's exam fees, survey finds
image Coronavirus: 'Vaccinating children could avoid further disruption to education'
image 'We want to have a conversation with parents about healthy parameters around phone use'
image Girls of colour more likely to be sexually harassed at school, findings suggest
image LGBT+ pupils 'twice as likely to have been bullied than their straight peers'
image 'Our obsession with Oxbridge means we're missing out on lots of talent'
image Concerns raised over proposed BTEC reforms
image Government officials 'knew free childcare policy would push up nursery fees'

Exams 2021: Majority of headteachers want 75% rebate on this year's exam fees, survey finds

 

According to a survey by the Association of School and College Leaders, 65 per cent of headteachers want a rebate of at least 75 per cent on this year's exam fees. BBC News.

Speaking at the Girls' Schools Association's summer briefing, Simon Lebus, Ofqual's interim chief regulator, said the experience of teacher-assessed grading this year has left schools with a "strong desire" to see the return of exams in 2022. By Catherine Lough, Tes.

Roger Taylor, the former chair of Ofqual, writes in The Times reflecting on last year's grading system, saying: "The algorithm functioned as it was designed to, the unfairness lay in what it was asked to do". Mr Taylor has also admitted that Ofqual "allowed some results to be awarded knowing that they would need to be changed on appeal". By Catherine Lough, Tes.

 

Coronavirus: 'Vaccinating children could avoid further disruption to education'

 

Professor Chris Whitty, the Government's chief medical officer, has suggested that expanding the COVID vaccine rollout to include schoolchildren could help minimise disruption to their learning. By Camilla Turner, The Telegraph.

The Financial Times explores the impact of the pandemic on independent schools, particularly with regard to the drop in the number of overseas students. By Andrew Jack. The article quotes Barnaby Lenon, chairman of the ISC, David Woodgate, chief executive of the Independent Schools' Bursars Association, and the heads of several schools in membership of the ISC's constituent associations.

 

'We want to have a conversation with parents about healthy parameters around phone use'

 

The Times explores the actions Alleyn's School has taken in response to the testimonies of sexual abuse and harassment shared to the Everyone's Invited website. In the article, Jane Lunnon, head of the school, highlights the importance of "healthy parameters around phone use", adding that online pornography "changes the way our kids think about sex and about other genders". By Nicola Woolcock.

 
image
The Times

Girls of colour more likely to be sexually harassed at school, findings suggest

 

A new study by Girlguiding, the UK's largest girl-only youth organisation, has found that two thirds of all girls have suffered sexual harassment at school from fellow pupils, and that girls of colour are more likely to be sexually harassed both in school and in public places away from the school gates. By Maya Oppenheim, The Independent.

 
image
The Independent

LGBT+ pupils 'twice as likely to have been bullied than their straight peers'

 

According to research from the LGBT+ charity Just Like Us, 42 per cent of LGBT+ pupils in the UK aged 11-18 have been bullied in the last year, compared to 21 per cent of their straight peers. By Jasmine Andersson, iNews.

Tes reports on separate findings from the charity, which suggest only 40 per cent of LGBT+ primary and secondary school staff are out to their pupils. By Dave Speck.

 

'Our obsession with Oxbridge means we're missing out on lots of talent'

 

The Telegraph features an interview with Sir Peter Lampl, founder of the Sutton Trust, who shares his thoughts on social mobility efforts in Britain. By Boudicca Fox-Leonard.

 
image
The Telegraph

Concerns raised over proposed BTEC reforms

 

Eleven education organisations have issued a joint statement expressing their concerns over plans from the Government which could see funding removed for BTEC qualifications. They warn a move towards a binary system, where most students would either pursue A-levels or the Government's new T-levels, would "leave many students without a viable pathway at the age of 16". By Will Hazell, iNews.

 
image
iNews

Government officials 'knew free childcare policy would push up nursery fees'

 

According to The Telegraph, official documents obtained under Freedom of Information laws show government officials acknowledged that introducing 30-hours free childcare for three and four-year-olds in England was likely to increase the price of nursery fees for parents. By Camilla Turner.

 
image
The Telegraph

 

The Independent Schools Council (ISC) monitors the national and educational press in order to keep independent schools up-to-date with relevant education news. The DNS is a service primarily for schools in membership of ISC associations, although other interested parties can choose to sign-up. We endeavour to include relevant news and commentary and, wherever possible, notable public letters. Where capacity allows, we may include links to ISC blogs, press statements and information about school or association events. News stories are selected based on their relevance to the independent sector as a whole. Editorial control of the DNS remains solely with the ISC.

Sign-up to the email service is available on our website.

Members can contact the ISC if they know in advance of news, letters or opinions that are likely to feature in the media, or are aware of existing coverage which they would like to see featured in the DNS.

Headlines and first-line summaries are written by the ISC with the link directing to the source material. You should read and comply with the terms and conditions of the websites to which we link.