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Daily News Summary
1 July 2021

image Coronavirus: Gavin Williamson suggests school bubbles could be scrapped on 19 July
image Exams 2021: Scotland's education secretary pledges to take responsibility for any backlash over grades
image 'We should do anything we can to help screen-addicted youngsters discover the natural world'
image 'How to introduce a successful peer mentoring programme'

Coronavirus: Gavin Williamson suggests school bubbles could be scrapped on 19 July

 

Education secretary Gavin Williamson has said the Government hopes to lift restrictions and school bubbles as part of Step 4 of England's roadmap out of lockdown. By Zoe Tidman, The Independent.

Almost 50 Conservative MPs have signed a joint letter to Boris Johnson warning: "It is vital that all schools go back to normal from 19th July when restrictions lift, even if just for the last few days of term." By Lucy Fisher, The Telegraph.

The prime minister's official spokesman has said "it is not a requirement necessarily that whole school bubbles need to isolate" when just one pupil tests positive for the virus. By Camilla Turner, Harry Yorke and Dominic Penna, The Telegraph.

According to BBC News, the Government does not monitor how many children self-isolating test positive for the virus. By Nick Triggle.

iNews reports some teenagers are using TikTok to learn how to fake positive COVID tests. By Rhiannon Williams and Will Hazell.

Louise Simpson, head of Exeter School, writes to The Times arguing that replacing the bubble system in schools with a "more sustainable approach" is "a more pertinent issue for those making the decisions that banning mobiles in schools". The letter is the third featured on the page.

Jon Richards, Unison's head of education, has described proposals to scrap school bubbles as "dangerous", arguing the Government should instead reintroduce face coverings and place children in smaller bubbles. By John Roberts, Tes.

Primary school leaders have expressed concerns that the sector has been "completely forgotten" in the Government's plans for managing COVID from September. By John Roberts, Tes.

Professor Robert Dingwall, of the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation, has suggested that children "may be better protected by natural immunity generated through infection" than by taking the "possible risk" of a vaccine. By Chris Smyth, The Times.

Robert Halfon, chairman of the Education Select Committee, writes in The Telegraph stating: "If we are to avoid destroying the life chances of children, then Government must come up with a properly resourced long-term plan for education."

Sir Peter Lampl, founder and chairman of the Sutton Trust, has denounced the Government's "derisory" funding package for school catch-up. By Camilla Turner, The Telegraph.

Harry Hudson writes in The Telegraph arguing the announcement that sports days can take place "offers schools a precious chance to rebuild their sense of community".

 

Exams 2021: Scotland's education secretary pledges to take responsibility for any backlash over grades

 

Shirley-Anne Somerville, the Scottish education secretary, has said teachers should not be blamed for any perceived shortcomings in this year's grading model, adding: "I will absolutely take responsibility for the fact that we, as a government, have signed this process off." By Mark McLaughlin, The Times.

The Scottish Government has been criticised for excluding school support staff from a £400 payment going to teachers in recognition of the extra work involved in awarding qualifications this year. By Emma Seith, Tes.

 

'We should do anything we can to help screen-addicted youngsters discover the natural world'

 

Sally Jones writes in The Telegraph welcoming a proposal to introduce a GCSE in natural history, saying: "We must strive to maintain the love of nature we rediscovered in lockdown."

 
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The Telegraph

'How to introduce a successful peer mentoring programme'

 

Anna White, student support counsellor at Hartland International School, Dubai, outlines eight tips for schools interested in setting up a peer mentoring programme. Tes.

 
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Tes

 

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