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Daily News Summary
16 August 2021

image Exams 2021: A look back at this year's teacher-assessed grades
image Coronavirus: COVID vaccines to be rolled out to 16 and 17-year-olds
image Study reveals 35% of British Olympic medal winners attended independent schools
image Boarding school fees 'could rise by up to 6.5% next month'
image Schoolchildren to be offered lessons in consent, sexual assault and revenge porn
image Cambridge University admits record-breaking proportion of state school pupils
image 'It is hardly surprising that students should look to university to continue their progress'
image UCAS set to revise personal statements for university

Exams 2021: A look back at this year's teacher-assessed grades

 

Tes explores how the switch to teacher assessment affected this year's GCSE and A-level grades. By Catherine Lough and Amy Gibbons. The article quotes Barnaby Lenon, chairman of the ISC.

Geoff Barton, general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders, writes in Tes reflecting on this year's exam results, arguing "there is an opportunity here to create a system that is less harsh on young people, less punitive in its deployment in accountability measures, and more fit for the future".

Writing in The Telegraph, Daniel Hannan argues controversy over 2021 grades "is the latest disaster to befall a Government incapable of taking tough choices and standing up to vested interests".

An anonymous independent school teacher writes in The Sunday Times sharing their experience of this year's assessment system, adding that parental interventions over grades "have intensified".

The Government has been urged to provide more funding for sixth forms and colleges, after last week's record-breaking GCSE results led to a surge in demand for places. Tes.

An independent commission is to publish a report later this year calling for "radical change" to the exams system, with Louise Hayward, chair of the commission, saying: “Do or die exams are stressful, unfair and they don’t measure what is important for young people’s future." By Sian Griffiths, The Sunday Times.

According to The Sunday Times, the Scottish Government is expected to announce the return of exams in 2022 in the coming days, although some changes to assessment procedures are likely. By John Boothman.

 

Coronavirus: COVID vaccines to be rolled out to 16 and 17-year-olds

 

The Government has confirmed that all 16 and 17-year-olds in England will be offered their first coronavirus vaccine dose by 23 August. By Lauren Turner, BBC News.

Some parents are reportedly still struggling to get a COVID vaccine for their clinically extremely vulnerable children, nearly a month after they were added to the rollout. By Katharine Da Costa, BBC News.

Speaking to The Telegraph, Professor Adam Finn, a member of the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation, said 'we need to stop victimising children by disrupting their lives when they aren't really important players in the pandemic'. By Joe Shute.

An editorial piece in The Telegraph urges the Government to prioritise educational recovery, adding "there's a risk of sliding into the view that pupils will bounce back of their own accord".

Financial Times reports some schools are turning to artificial intelligence to support learning during the pandemic. By Madhumita Murgia. The article quotes Jonnie Noakes, head of teaching and learning at Eton College, and mentions Cottesmore School.

Professor Mark Mon-Williams, a University of Leeds academic who is leading trials testing the use of air filtering devices in classrooms to help reduce COVID transmission in schools, has said the technology could also cut other absences related to illnesses such as flu. By Dan Worth, Tes.

Experts have warned that millions of children could face a lifetime of tooth decay, after dental check-ups fell by 50 per cent during the first year of the pandemic. By Laura Donnelly and Rosie Taylor, The Telegraph.

BBC News explores what the reopening of Scottish schools will look like, as pupils begin the return to classrooms this week. By Lucy Whyte.

 

Study reveals 35% of British Olympic medal winners attended independent schools

 

Schools Week provides an analysis of the educational backgrounds of this year's British Olympic medal winners, which shows 35 per cent attended independent schools. By Tom Belger and Samantha Booth.

The Sunday Times explores how athlete Duncan Scott, who was awarded a scholarship to Strathallan School as a child, rose to Olympic success.

 

Boarding school fees 'could rise by up to 6.5% next month'

 

The Sunday Times reports the cost of sending a child to some UK boarding schools could reach nearly £45,000 for the first time. By Imogen Tew. The article quotes Julie Robinson, chief executive of the ISC.

 
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The Sunday Times

Schoolchildren to be offered lessons in consent, sexual assault and revenge porn

 

According to The Telegraph, campaign group Reclaim These Streets has helped devise new teaching materials for schools on the topics of consent, sexual assault, victim blaming and revenge porn, in the wake of the murder of Sarah Everard. By Craig Simpson.

 
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The Telegraph

Cambridge University admits record-breaking proportion of state school pupils

 

The University of Cambridge has said that state school students are likely to make up between 71 and 72 per cent of its intake this autumn, up from 70.6 per cent in 2020. By Will Hazell, iNews.

 
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iNews

'It is hardly surprising that students should look to university to continue their progress'

 

Chris Skidmore MP, who was universities minister from 2018 to 2020, writes in The Telegraph arguing those who claim too many students are going to university "ignore the world-beating value of a British higher education".

 
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The Telegraph

UCAS set to revise personal statements for university

 

Clare Marchant, chief executive of UCAS, has said traditional personal statements used for university applications need to be reformed, adding: "Giving students, particularly those who are disadvantaged, much more structure and support as they prepare their personal statement is something we’re focused on over the next 12 to 18 months." By Nicola Woolcock, The Times.

 
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The Times

 

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