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Daily News Summary
20 September 2019

image Labour activists face criticism for private school motion
image 'Why the IB could replace A-levels altogether'
image Girls' school introduces comedy classes to 'boost pupils' confidence'
image Almost one in five pupils leave school 'without basic qualifications'
image Record number of disadvantaged pupils offered university places this year
image More than half of teachers say they are 'not listened to at work'

Labour activists face criticism for private school motion

 

The Times' leading article focuses on Labour's proposals for private schools, and argues 'politicians should value independent schools as a resource, representing potential that could be further unlocked for the benefit of all'.

The paper also reports on headteachers' perspectives on the issue. By Nicola Woolcock and Rosemary Bennett. The article quotes Cheryl Giovannoni, chief executive of the Girls' Day School Trust (GDST), Julie Keller, head of Nottingham Girls' High School, and Nina Gunson, head of Sheffield High School for Girls.

In a letter to The Times, Neil Roskilly, chief executive of the Independent Schools Association, argues integrating independent schools into the state system would 'decimate nursery and special needs provision, create larger state school classes, raise unemployment levels, and destroy Britain's soft power overseas'. The letter is the fifth featured on the page.

Martin Stephen, former independent school head, writes in The Telegraph arguing plans to abolish independent schools represent "an attack on aspiration".

Geoff Barton, general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders, warns "dismantling a sector that serves 570,000 students is ethically dubious and logistically problematic". Tes.

'Why the IB could replace A-levels altogether'

 

The Telegraph explores the differences between A-levels and the International Baccalaureate (IB), and suggests the latter could better prepare students for the wider world. By Helena Pozniak. The article quotes Henry Coverdale, assistant head of King Edward's School in Birmingham, and Simone Lorenz-Weir, head of upper school at Oakham.

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The Telegraph

Girls' school introduces comedy classes to 'boost pupils' confidence'

 

Sheffield High School for Girls has started running stand-up comedy classes for their sixth form students so they have the courage to engage in "difficult conversations" later in life. By Camilla Turner, The Telegraph. The article quotes Nina Gunson, head of Sheffield High School for Girls, and Cheryl Giovannoni, chief executive of the GDST.

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The Telegraph

Almost one in five pupils leave school 'without basic qualifications'

 

Anne Longfield, the children's commissioner, has warned around 100,000 pupils a year leave schools in England without five good GCSEs or equivalent technical qualifications. BBC News.

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BBC

Record number of disadvantaged pupils offered university places this year

 

New figures from UCAS show 25,910 students from disadvantaged backgrounds have confirmed places at university this year. By Sally Weale, The Guardian.

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The Guardian

More than half of teachers say they are 'not listened to at work'

 

According to a survey carried out by Tes, 53 per cent of teachers feel they 'do not have a voice' in how their school is run. By Dave Speck, Tes.

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Tes

 

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