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Daily News Summary
5 February 2019

image Letters: Banning mobile phones in schools
image Independent schools: Social mobility and government subsidies
image Relationship lessons for children to help handle internet risks
image Social media platforms forced to sign code of conduct to protect children
image The decline of music in schools
image "Dangerous" lack of SEND support in classrooms
image The importance of outdoor learning

Letters: Banning mobile phones in schools

 

A number of heads have written letters to The Times discussing the Government’s intention to offer schools more structured guidance over mobile phones.

Samantha Price, headmistress at Benenden School in Kent, welcomes the Government's input and argues that schools must "take a firm line" to manage pupils' mobile usage.

Mark S Steed, director at Jumeirah English Speaking School, Dubai, writes that schools can only do so much to limit pupils' time on their phones.

Jane Prescott, headmistress at Portsmouth High School, writes that "banning mobile phones in school is not the answer to reducing screen time".

Letters just above half-way.

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The Times

Independent schools: Social mobility and government subsidies

 

There is further discussion about independent schools in the press, following the publication of 'Engines of Privilege: the private-school problem'.

Ed Miliband, Labour MP and former party leader, writes that private school reform "needs to be taken seriously" in order for society to become more equal. Metro.

Robert Verkaik, author of 'Posh Boys: How the English Public Schools Ruin Britain', writes in The Guardian about government schemes that provide funding for independent schools. The article quotes Julie Robinson, general secretary of the Independent Schools Council.

Relationship lessons for children to help handle internet risks

 

Relationship lessons for primary and secondary school children will become compulsory next year, in a bid to handle the dangers of the internet. By Charles Hymas, The Telegraph.

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The Telegraph

Social media platforms forced to sign code of conduct to protect children

 

Technology companies will have to sign a compulsory code of conduct, following rising pressure to protect children from harmful online content. By Kaya Burgess, The Times.

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The Times

The decline of music in schools

 

A report for the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Music Education has warned music education is under threat due to squeezed funding and accountability pressures. By Helen Ward, Tes.

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Tes

"Dangerous" lack of SEND support in classrooms

 

Unions have warned there are not enough staff in schools who are adequately trained to support pupils with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND). By Dave Speck, Tes.

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Tes

The importance of outdoor learning

 

Adam Black, a primary teacher in Scotland, writes that outdoor learning can create new opportunities for children. Tes.

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Tes

 

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