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Daily News Summary
16 April 2019

image Letters: The impact of debt on student mental health
image 'University sector must decide whether A-level results matter'
image Families await news about primary school places
image Legal action planned over baseline tests for four-year-olds
image Forty per cent of UK teachers plan to quit within five years, survey finds
image What you need to know about the 2019 teaching union conferences
image Teachers vote not to punish pupils who choose climate change protests over class
image The teacher who lives in a van to work at the school he loves

Letters: The impact of debt on student mental health

 

Neil Roskilly, chief executive of the Independent Schools Association, writes to The Times warning of the mental health issues young people can face due to student debt. The letter appears about half-way down the page.

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The Times

'University sector must decide whether A-level results matter'

 

Laura McInerney, chief executive of Teacher Tapp, has said it is time for universities to decide whether A-level grades matter in order to stop different generations being given conflicting messages about the value of the exams. The Guardian.

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The Guardian

Families await news about primary school places

 

Today is the day when families in England discover whether they have secured a place at their preferred primary school. By Sean Coughlan, BBC News.

According to research, nearly 100,000 pupils will be given places at under-performing or failing primary schools. By Rosemary Bennett, The Times. Writing for the same newspaper, Luke Tryl describes this news as a "burning injustice".

The Telegraph reports the number of primary pupils being taught in "super size" classes has reached a 10-year high. By Camilla Turner.

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BBC

Legal action planned over baseline tests for four-year-olds

 

Campaigners are set to hand in a 65,000-signature petition at 10 Downing Street next week in protest against planned baseline tests for children aged four and five. By Liz Lightfoot, The Guardian.

The Guardian also reports that primary school teachers are to be balloted on boycotting Sats, amid concerns the exams are harming children’s mental health. By Sally Weale.

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The Guardian

Forty per cent of UK teachers plan to quit within five years, survey finds

 

The results of a survey by the National Education Union suggest four out of 10 teachers plan to quit the profession due to "huge workloads and excessive accountability". By Hannah Richardson, BBC News.

Tes features an interview with Year 6 teacher, Helen Reeder, who gives an insight into the "unbearable" workload in a typical working week. By Dave Speck.

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BBC

What you need to know about the 2019 teaching union conferences

 

Tes details the 'need-to-knows' about this year's teaching union conferences. By William Stewart.

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Tes

Teachers vote not to punish pupils who choose climate change protests over class

 

Members of the National Education Union have passed a motion to oppose “any reprisals” against pupils who skip class to take part in the next climate change school strike and protest. By Rosemary Bennett, The Times.

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The Times

The teacher who lives in a van to work at the school he loves

 

Writing anonymously for The Guardian, one teacher explains why he has chosen to live in a van 80 miles away from his family in order to work at a school he is passionate about.

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The Guardian

 

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