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Daily News Summary
30 Nov 2015

image TES independent school awards 2015
image Teens sent to 'unsuitable' university to do 'obscure' subjects, head claims
image State schools should set up fee-paying branches abroad to raise cash, leading head says
image Private school teacher complains girls 'cramming their heads full of facts'
image Bernard Trafford: There’s no such thing as a trouble-free teen
image 'In an uncertain and unsafe world, we all need geography more than ever'
image Good news Friday: out of this world
image Answer the question: Boarders need a chance to settle, but it’s not right for all
image All schools to be academies by 2020
image Foster care raises children’s GCSE results by six grades
image Half of teachers rarely use technology in class
image Girls 'expect to earn £7,000 less than boys', study finds
image No teacher lets them suffer: inside the German schools taking in refugees

TES independent school awards 2015

 

The TES hosted their annual awards ceremony last week. Winners included St Joseph's College, Reading; The Moat School; St John's School, Leatherhead; King Edward's School, Birmingham; Ashford School; Bredon School; Kent College, Canterbury; Leicester Grammar School; Uppingham School and Wellington College. Sally Hobbs, headteacher at Orchard House School also won the lifetime achievement award.

The Schools Together Website has also written a summary item on the winning school in the best maintained/independent collaboration category.

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TES
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Teens sent to 'unsuitable' university to do 'obscure' subjects, head claims

 

Private schools are persuading students to take niche subjects just so they can get into Oxbridge, a headteacher has claimed as research shows one in ten felt they have made the wrong choice. Jonathan Taylor, head of North Bridge House Senior School Canonbury in London, also argued students are not getting the personal support they need or the right advice from schools when it comes to choosing a university. Chris Ramsey, headmaster of King’s Chester and universities spokesman for the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference (HMC) is also quoted. By Javier Espinoza, The Telegraph.

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Telegraph

State schools should set up fee-paying branches abroad to raise cash, leading head says

 

British state schools should be allowed to set up branches abroad to raise millions of pounds a year, a leading head has said. Dame Dana Ross-Wawrzynski has urged the Government to help a hundred of the country’s best state schools to set up fee-paying counterparts in countries such as China, Qatar, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia. Quotes Julian Thomas, Master of Wellington College. By Javier Espinoza, The Telegraph.

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Telegraph

Private school teacher complains girls 'cramming their heads full of facts'

 

A private school teacher has complained about how "today's girls aren't going on nature walks or learning poetry off by heart - they're cramming their heads full of facts". Blanche Girouard, who teaches religious education at the £20,000 a year St Paul's Girls' School, also suggested girls were happier when they were simply expected to marry rather than go to university. By Samuel Osborne, The Independent on Sunday. Also reported by The Sunday Telegraph.

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Independent
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Sunday Telegraph

Bernard Trafford: There’s no such thing as a trouble-free teen

 

Dr Bernard Trafford shares his advice on something that all families will eventually face: a rebellious youngster. Dr Trafford is head of The Royal Grammar School, Newcastle Upon Tyne and a former chairman of the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference (HMC). The Sunday Times.

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Sunday Times

'In an uncertain and unsafe world, we all need geography more than ever'

 

The social sciences have never been more important, argues one leading educationist. They should be given more prominence in the curriculum. By Kevin Stannard, Director of Innovation & Learning, The Girls' Day School Trust (GDST). The TES.

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TES

Good news Friday: out of this world

 

BMX Flatland Champion encourages pupils to get on their bikes, while pupils at Warwick Prep touch the moon. The Telegraph’s weekly good news round-up. Quotes Mrs Charl (head of science) and Miss Wilby (a science teacher) at Warwick Prep School and Jennie Phillips, headmistress of Agincourt School and Nursery in Monmouth. Mentions City of London School. By Josie Gurney-Read, The Telegraph.

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Telegraph

Answer the question: Boarders need a chance to settle, but it’s not right for all

 

Andrew Halls, head master of King’s College School in Wimbledon, southwest London, replies to readers’ queries in The Sunday Times.

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Sunday Times

All schools to be academies by 2020

 

Every English state school could be released from local council control and turned into an academy by 2020, under government plans due to be published in the spring. A “reforming” bill being drafted in the Department for Education (DfE), which would complete the “true blue” education revolution started by the former education secretary Michael Gove, is expected to be debated next year. By Sian Griffiths, The Sunday Times.

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Sunday Times

Foster care raises children’s GCSE results by six grades

 

Children removed from their family home and placed in foster care achieve significantly more academically at the age of 16 than those who stay with their parents under the watch of social workers, according to the first research on the subject. By Rosemary Bennett, The Times.

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Times

Half of teachers rarely use technology in class

 

Almost half of teachers rarely use the technology available in their classrooms and many say they do not know how to operate it, a survey has found. Interactive whiteboards are common in classrooms, most schools have access to computers and many are connected to electronic learning networks. By Greg Hurst, The Times.

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Times

Girls 'expect to earn £7,000 less than boys', study finds

 

Both genders overestimated their earning but girls were more accurate about the pay disparity with official figures showing the pay gap in the UK is 19.2 per cent. By Javier Espinoza, Education Editor, The Telegraph.

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Telegraph

No teacher lets them suffer: inside the German schools taking in refugees

 

With 325,000 refugee children expected to enter German schools, teachers face unprecedented challenges. But they are determined to support new arrivals. By Abby Young-Powell, The Observer.

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Observer

 

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