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Daily News Summary
1 Sep 2015

image ISC Year 11 Results
image 'Exams put pressure on children – that is their virtue'
image Longer lessons help to boost school’s grades
image Exams out of tune with women’s world
image Mobile phones are useful in classroom, say private heads
image Exam quota system
image Answer the question: No grade but a year’s extra wisdom from a ditched A-level
image Teacher shortages and rising pupil numbers puts schools on edge of crisis
image Siblings to get preference for primary places
image Teachers claim social media makes parents more aggressive
image Low-cost school takes a lesson from home education

ISC Year 11 Results

 

Following the release of year 11 results for ISC independent schools, the press compiled and published various league tables. The Telegraph and The Times have published tables, in which Wycombe Abbey School came top in both.

The Telegraph carried a news story ‘One third of private school pupils awarded A* at GCSE’, revealing that the grades scored by ISC pupils are equivalent to 2 A* and 7 As (the article is not yet available online).

In related coverage, The Daily Mail reported that figures have shown independent schools are shunning mainstream GCSEs amid fears they are not challenging enough. This year has seen a 12 per cent rise in pupils at independent schools doing International GCSEs, which are based on the old O-level. Quoted is John Claughton, chief master of King Edward’s School in Birmingham.

An article on the issue of GCSE exam results at independent schools which is published on the BT News website also quotes Barnaby Lenon and Martin Claughton, High Master of King Edward’s School.

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Telegraph
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Times
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Daily Mail
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BT News

'Exams put pressure on children – that is their virtue'

 

Those who think children should never be challenged by exams are the enemies of good education, writes Barnaby Lenon, former head at Harrow and chairman of the Independent Schools Council (ISC). The Sunday Telegraph.

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Sunday Telegraph

Longer lessons help to boost school’s grades

 

Longer lessons to enable bright pupils to spend longer immersing themselves in ideas, topics or tasks helped Manchester Grammar School to push its GCSE results even higher this summer. A rejig of the timetable means that pupils have six lessons a day, rather than seven, each running for 50 minutes instead of 40. Quotes Martin Boulton, the high master of Manchester Grammar. By Greg Hurst, Education Editor, The Times.

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Times

Exams out of tune with women’s world

 

Top girls’ schools have begun a campaign to get prominent women in science, history, art and music onto the curriculum and overturn the “default” position of exam boards to feature mainly men. Quotes Helen Fraser, chief executive of The Girls’ Day School Trust (GDST) and Dr Millan Sachania, headmaster at Streatham and Clapham High School. By Sian Griffiths, Education Editor, The Sunday Times.

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Sunday Times

Mobile phones are useful in classroom, say private heads

 

Banning mobile phones in schools is pointless and shows a luddite attitude to technology, leading independent head teachers say. They said that children should instead be harnessing the power of smartphones in the classroom. Quotes Caroline Jordan, the headmistress of Headington School in Oxford; Will Phelan head at Stamford School in Lincolnshire; John Moule, warden at Radley School and Andrew Halls, head of King’s College School in Wimbledon. By Nicola Woolcock, Education Correspondent, The Times. Also reported by The Sunday Times.

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Times
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Sunday Times

Exam quota system

 

A letter published in The Times from Head of classics, Benenden School, Cranbrook, Kent, and principal examiner, CIE international A-level classical studies.

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Times

Answer the question: No grade but a year’s extra wisdom from a ditched A-level

 

This week’s questions are answered by Andrew Halls, head master of King’s College School in Wimbledon, southwest London. The Sunday Times.

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School's website

Teacher shortages and rising pupil numbers puts schools on edge of crisis

 

Recent figures paint a startling picture of teacher shortages in Britain – with subjects such as English, geography and maths most affected. By Daniel Boffey, The Observer.

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Observer

Siblings to get preference for primary places

 

Parents with a child in a primary school are to be given priority when applying for a place for their younger children. The change in approach to admissions, signalled by ministers as families prepare to start school this week, is intended to make journeys to school easier for parents with young children. By Greg Hurst, Education Editor, The Times. Also reported by The Sunday Times.

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Times
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Sunday Times

Teachers claim social media makes parents more aggressive

 

Parents have become more aggressive to teachers and the problem is fuelled by social media, a survey suggests. The poll of almost 800 teachers found that as many as three quarters thought that parents’ behaviour had worsened in the past five years. Parents were whipping up other families on Facebook and making them anxious about school problems. By Nicola Woolcock, Education Correspondent, The Times.

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Times

Low-cost school takes a lesson from home education

 

A tiny low-cost private school founded by a group of parents who had been home-educating their children is celebrating its first set of exam results. Four teenage pupils at Heritage School in Cambridge each sat an International GCSE a year early this summer while a fifth took two IGCSEs – and all were awarded A* grades. By Greg Hurst, Education Editor, The Times.

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Times

 

ISC monitors the national and educational press in order to keep independent schools and other interested parties up-to-date with education news. We endeavour to include all relevant news and commentary and, wherever possible, notable public letters.

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If you know in advance of news, letters or opinions that are likely to feature in the media, or are aware of existing coverage which you would like to see featured in the DNS, please contact ISC.

Headlines and first-line summaries are usually taken directly from the news outlets. Occasionally ISC will summarise the report. You should read and comply with the terms and conditions of the websites to which we link.