image  

Daily News Summary
12 Oct 2015

image Boys’ classes breed laddish culture of sexism, says head
image Be 'boring and predictable', teachers told – and don't nag
image Is this the end for tailcoats at Eton College?
image Boarding abroad: cut fees and experience different cultures
image Answer the question: Schools don’t get to decide not to talk to divorced fathers
image Huge shortfall in teachers forces schools to look overseas for new recruits
image Anger as poorer pupils with low 11-plus marks get grammar school places while middle-class children miss out
image ‘Fines’ if universities fail poor students
image Oxford offers sanctuary for Syria’s fleeing academics
image Playing video games, not using social media, linked to poor exam results

Boys’ classes breed laddish culture of sexism, says head

 

Boys’ schools breed casual sexism and are socially divisive, according to the head teacher of a leading independent mixed school. Richard Cairns, head of Brighton College, also accused the headmistress of a girls’ school of being “breathtakingly patronising”. Vivienne Durham, head of Francis Holland School in London, had claimed that clever girls clam up in mixed environments. Mentions Clarissa Farr, head of St Paul’s Girls’ School in London. By Nicola Woolcock, Education Correspondent, The Times.

image
Times

Be 'boring and predictable', teachers told – and don't nag

 

Teachers should be “boring and predictable” rather than trying to be “matey” with their students, independent school headteachers have said. Mentions the annual conference of the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference (HMC) and quotes Leo Winkley, headmaster of St Peter’s School in York and vice-chair of the Boarding Schools Association (BSA). By Kaye Wiggins, The TES. The TES also included a light-hearted round-up from the HMC conference last week, mentioning Ed Elliott, head of the Perse School in Cambridge and Chris King, chair of the HMC.

image
TES
image
TES

Is this the end for tailcoats at Eton College?

 

Eton’s new (and youngest-ever) headmaster Simon Henderson wants more bursaries, 'real world’ values – and might even bin the tailcoats. By Peter Stanford, The Telegraph.

image
Telegraph

Boarding abroad: cut fees and experience different cultures

 

Sending expat children to school in Europe can boost their language skills and career prospects while saving their parents money. Quotes Robin Fletcher, national director of the UK-based Boarding Schools Association (BSA) and Colin Bell, chief executive of the Council of British International Schools (COBIS). Reference is made to data from the Independent Schools Council (ISC). By Nick Morrison, The Telegraph.

image
Telegraph

Answer the question: Schools don’t get to decide not to talk to divorced fathers

 

This week’s questions are answered by Andrew Halls, head master of King’s College School, Wimbledon. The Sunday Times.

image
Sunday Times

Huge shortfall in teachers forces schools to look overseas for new recruits

 

Figures show a record 50,000 teachers left the profession in a year, even though pupil numbers continue to grow. By Daniel Boffey, The Observer.

image
Guardian

Anger as poorer pupils with low 11-plus marks get grammar school places while middle-class children miss out

 

Children from poor homes are being given coveted places at top grammar schools despite scoring significantly lower marks than others taking the same entrance exam. A group of schools have taken the controversial step of lowering the 11-plus qualifying score for children from disadvantaged backgrounds in a move denounced by critics as ‘social engineering’ that discriminates against the middle classes. By Jonathan Petre, The Mail on Sunday.

image
Mail on Sunday

‘Fines’ if universities fail poor students

 

Universities will be penalised if they fail to open up to working-class students, get them through their degrees and find them good jobs. Under government plans to improve the quality of teaching at campuses across England, universities that fail to meet new standards will lose funding. By Sian Griffiths and Julie Henry, The Sunday Times.

image
Sunday Times

Oxford offers sanctuary for Syria’s fleeing academics

 

Oxford University is opening its doors to desperate Syrian academics fleeing the bombed ruins of their academic institutions. By Will Humphries, The Times.

image
Times

Playing video games, not using social media, linked to poor exam results

 

Playing video games is more likely to have a negative impact on a child's GCSE results than using social media, a study has found. Around 77% of 14-16 year-olds who play games rarely achieved five 'good' GCSE grades, compared to 41pc who play games twice a day, the report claimed. By Rhiannon Williams, The Telegraph.

image
Telegraph

 

ISC monitors the national and educational press in order to keep independent schools and other interested parties up-to-date with education news. We endeavour to include all relevant news and commentary and, wherever possible, notable public letters.

Back issues of DNS and sign-up to the email service are available on our website.

If you know in advance of news, letters or opinions that are likely to feature in the media, or are aware of existing coverage which you would like to see featured in the DNS, please contact ISC.

Headlines and first-line summaries are usually taken directly from the news outlets. Occasionally ISC will summarise the report. You should read and comply with the terms and conditions of the websites to which we link.