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ISC Daily News Summary

Monday 27 April 2015

Independent sector

'Political interference in education has got to stop'

Decisions in education should be made on the basis of hard-won experience in the classroom, not ideology from above, says Richard Harman, headmaster of Uppingham School and Chair of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference (HMC). The Telegraph.

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Independent sector

State pupils become the new boarder force

Boarding at state schools is booming as busy, hard-working parents increasingly choose it for their teenagers, according to figures to be released this week. Tony Little, head of Eton College and honorary president of the Boarding Schools Association, is quoted and Wellington College is mentioned. By Sian Griffiths, Education Editor, The Sunday Times.

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Independent sector

Call for state and private schools to work together

State and private schools have been urged to overcome their traditional suspicions and work together more closely. John Edward, director of the Scottish Council for Independent Schools (SCIS) said greater collaboration would improve the availability of qualifications and help foster sporting and cultural links. Reference is made to a recent survey by SCIS. Mentions Hutchesons' Grammar in Glasgow; Merchiston Castle in Edinburgh; St Leonards in St Andrews and Lomond School in Helensburgh. By Andrew Denholm, Education Correspondent, The Herald.

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Independent sector

Breaking out of the confines of A-levels with the IB

Supporters of the International Baccalaureate – and there are many – claim it teaches pupils how to think, says Eleanor Doughty. Quotes Andrew Shackleton, director of studies and IB coordinator at Edinburgh’s Fettes College; Simon Armitage, the former head of sixth form the Stephen Perse Foundation, Cambridge; Hadrian Briggs, IB coordinator at The Red Maids’ School in Bristol; John Sprague, director of IB at Sevenoaks School in Kent and Andrew Fleck, headmaster at Sedbergh School in Cumbria. The Telegraph.

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Independent sector

Middle East woos British teachers with pay and perks

Teachers are moving to the Middle East, enticed by generous pay packages to pay off their student loans, while British schools struggle to recruit enough teachers in core subjects. Mark Steed, head teacher at the Berkhamsted School who is leaving this summer to lead Jumeirah English Speaking School in Dubai, is quoted. By Nicola Woolcock, Education Correspondent, The Times.

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Independent sector

Your dream school: entrance this way

Desperate to get your child into a top independent or grammar? Andrew Halls, a leading head, gives his tips on how to do it but warns the ‘best’ can often be the worst choice. Andrew Halls is head of King’s College School, Wimbledon. The Sunday Times.

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Independent sector

Girls thrive in single sex schools because they do not have to impress boys, head says

Single sex education is better for teenage girls as it takes the pressure off them to try and impress boys in a “sexualised world”, the headmistress of one of Britain's best boarding schools has claimed. Rhiannon Wilkinson, head of Wycombe Abbey in Buckinghamshire, suggested female pupils were allowed to "remain girls for longer" at boarding school so they can focus on their work. Mentions Tony Little, headmaster of Eton. By Javier Espinoza, Education Editor, The Sunday Telegraph.

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Education policy

Miliband ‘should exert personal authority’ to keep grammars

Ed Miliband should personally guarantee the status of grammar schools if he became prime minister. By Javier Espinoza, Education Editor, The Telegraph.

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Teaching and learning

Teachers’ tricks for helping pupils cheat

Teachers are helping students to cheat by writing their coursework, inflating essay marks and even giving them advice during tests, research by the exam watchdog has revealed. By Sian Griffiths and Julie Henry, The Sunday Times.

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Examinations

Pupils to learn about global financial crisis as part of economics A-level

Teenagers will learn about the global financial crisis and market failure for the first time as part of the redesigned economics A-level. By Javier Espinoza, Education Editor, The Sunday Telegraph.

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General education

Smartphones making children borderline autistic, warns expert

Children struggle to read emotions and are less empathetic than a generation ago because they spend too much time using tablets and smartphones, a leading psychiatrist has warned. Iain McGilchrist said children as young as five were less able to read facial expressions because of too much interaction with technology. By Javier Espinoza, Education Editor, The Telegraph. Also reported by The Independent.

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General education

'Give all children the chance to show their talents'

Around 20 per cent of children in England have special educational needs (SEN) – it's time we addressed the current policy that limits their potential, argues Duncan Rollo, The Sunday Telegraph.

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Higher education

Oxford branded ‘toxic’ after student suicides

The suicide of two students at the same Oxford college within three months of each other has fuelled a campaign to persuade the university to ease academic pressures and change the way it deals with youngsters suffering from depression and anxiety. By Sian Griffiths and Robin Henry, The Sunday Times.

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Higher education

UK university class sizes falling, study finds

Money committed to areas such as sport, careers services and counselling has increased under coalition government since legislation to increase tuition fees. By Press Association, The Guardian.

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Child welfare and parenting

Parents also have to play by the rules

Good parenting involves doing stuff you loathe for your children’s good. That's the really tricky bit. By Glenda Cooper, The Telegraph.

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International education news

Britain should be wary of borrowing education ideas from abroad

Policymakers need to be careful of myths about foreign education systems, such as Finland’s, and what has made them successful. By Pasi Sahlberg, The Guardian.

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Message from ISC

ISC Daily News Summary: Keeping you up to date with current events in education

All article headlines and first-line summaries are by the named journalists or news outlets unless otherwise stated. Wording of ‘private’ or ‘public’ schools may have been changed to ‘independent’ schools for consistency.You should read and comply with the terms and conditions of the websites to which we link in this news summary.

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Message from ISC

Omissions

ISC monitors daily the national press in order to keep independent schools up to date with current events in education by highlighting the significant media commentary on these events.

We endeavour to include all relevant news items and comment pieces and, wherever possible, notable public letters. However, due to the scope of education coverage – both in print and online – unfortunately, we do miss items from time to time.

If you are aware of national media coverage which you would like to see featured in the DNS please do not hesitate to contact the ISC who will be happy to include in the day’s summary.

If you believe a significant article has been omitted, or if you notice any factual errors in the DNS, please let us know so that we may make the correction on the following day. Many thanks.

ISC Press Office: Tracy.Cook@isc.co.uk

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