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ISC Daily News Summary

Wednesday 30 July 2014

Independent sector

Private schools are good for the economy

Sending more children to private school would add billions of pounds to Britain’s economy, a new report claims. Increased competition between independent schools could have raised GDP by £5,800 per person, according to Incentive to invest: how education affects economic growth, a study from the Adam Smith Institute. By Nicola Woolcock, Education Correspondent, The Times. Also reported by The Spectator (blogs).

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Independent sector

Top girls’ schools are on a quest to stop female pupils becoming obsessed with being perfect.

Oxford High School for Girls has launched an initiative dubbed ‘The Death of Little Miss Perfect’, which aims to teach girls it is ‘fine not to get everything right’. By Laura Clark, The Daily Mail. Quotes Judith Carlisle, headmistress at Oxford High School for Girls and Jo Heywood, headmistress at Heathfield School in Ascot.

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Independent sector

On the Money: Homework takes some of the pain out of school fees

Private school costs are still rising, but there are ways for hard-pressed parents to ease the burden. Average private school day fees in London have more than quadrupled since 1990, meaning a typical family in the capital would need to allocate 77% of their income to educate one child. That’s according to new findings from stockbroker Killik. Reference is made to the Independent Schools Council (ISC). By Lucy Tobin, The Evening Standard.

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Academies and free schools

Trust told academies not improving fast enough

An academies trust led by a former government adviser has been told too many of its schools are underperforming and not improving fast enough. By Hannah Richardson, BBC News education reporter.

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Higher education

Soft skills valued over technical knowledge in graduates

Effective communication and an ability to work as part of a team are valued more highly than technical knowledge by graduate employers, according to a new study. The survey of 198 UK employers found that soft skills, including confidence and an ability to be analytical were all valued more than technical knowledge by employers at the recruitment stage. By Josie Gurney-Read, Online Education Editor, The Telegraph.

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Higher education

More university places available this year for top performing A-level students

Bright teenagers who get better-than-expected A-level results next month are set to have a bigger chance of gaining places at some of the country’s leading universities. By Richard Garner, The Independent.

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Higher education

Give universities responsibility for student loans, former minister says

Universities should underwrite student loans to reduce the burden on the taxpayer and encourage them to play a greater role in getting jobs for graduates, the former universities minister has said. David Willetts, who was sacked in the reshuffle earlier this month, said that civil servants have drawn up proposals to allow universities to buy student debt and take on the risk themselves. By Steven Swinford, Senior Political Correspondent, The Telegraph. Also reported by The Times and BBC News.

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Child welfare and parenting

Stay-at-home mums and breadwinner dads make up just 20% of families

Only one in five families fits a traditional structure with a father who works and a mother who stays at home to raise the children. In Britain, 22 per cent of families were made up of a male breadwinner and a female who did not work in 2011, a slight decline from 23 per cent a decade earlier, but the picture is more dramatic across Europe. By Nicola Woolcock, Education Correspondent, The Times.

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And finally...

Reading scheme fronted by Frank Lampard sees success

Top footballers including Frank Lampard, Ashley Young and Raheem Sterling are having a positive impact on those who are struggling with reading at school. The number of children taking part in the Premier League Reading Stars programme who said they enjoy reading “very much” tripled after the ten-week scheme. By Emily Chan, The Telegraph.

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Message from ISC

ISC Daily News Summary: Keeping you up to date with current events in education

All article headlines and first-line summaries are by the named journalists or news outlets unless otherwise stated. Wording of ‘private’ or ‘public’ schools may have been changed to ‘independent’ schools for consistency.You should read and comply with the terms and conditions of the websites to which we link in this news summary.

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Message from ISC

Omissions

ISC monitors daily the national press in order to keep independent schools up to date with current events in education by highlighting the significant media commentary on these events.

We endeavour to include all relevant news items and comment pieces and, wherever possible, notable public letters. However, due to the scope of education coverage – both in print and online – unfortunately, we do miss items from time to time.

If you are aware of national media coverage which you would like to see featured in the DNS please do not hesitate to contact the ISC who will be happy to include in the day’s summary.

If you believe a significant article has been omitted, or if you notice any factual errors in the DNS, please let us know so that we may make the correction on the following day. Many thanks.

ISC Press Office: Tracy.Cook@isc.co.uk

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